The ProAir® HFA support library

We want to help you give patients the best care possible. ProAir HFA support is always here to help you teach patients about asthma, exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and how ProAir HFA can help. Look into the resources below.

Asthma resources

Learn more about the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of asthma with our asthma resources.

Asthma resources

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the lungs and has many triggers.1 It is characterized by airflow limitation due to airway inflammation, airway narrowing, and mucus hypersecretion.1 Triggers include tobacco smoke, dust mites, molds, pollen, pet dander, viruses, exercise, and anxiety.1

Key recommendations from the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma1:

Asthma diagnosis1

  • Medical history and physical examination to determine whether episodes of airway obstruction are present
  • In patients 5 years or older, determine whether airway obstruction is reversible by performing spirometry before and after use of a short-acting beta2-agonist (SABA)

Asthma treatment1

  • Develop a written asthma action plan
    • -
      SABAs like ProAir® HFA (albuterol sulfate) are a recommended treatment for relief of acute symptoms1
  • Patients who have symptoms more than twice a week during the day, other than for EIB, or who use more than one 200-puff SABA inhaler per month may require a long-term controller medication for asthma management

Reference

  1. National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health; October 2007.

EIB resources

Find out about the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of exercise-induced bronchospasm with our EIB resources.

EIB resources

Exercise-induced bronchospasm—or EIB—is found in up to 90% of patients with diagnosed asthma and in 5% to 20% of people without known asthma.1,2 Although EIB and asthma share some common symptoms, they are not the same condition.3,4 Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder; EIB is a temporary condition marked by short-lived episodes of airway obstruction triggered when moisture and temperature changes cause the airways to become constricted during or after exercise.3,5

Exercise-induced bronchospasm treatment

  • The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines for management of EIB recommend prevention and treatment with a short-acting beta2-agonist (SABA)3
    • -
      For prevention, dose 15 to 30 minutes before exercise3,6
    • -
      Treat with a SABA as episodes occur3
  • Encourage patients to warm up before exercise and to cover their mouths with a mask or scarf in cold weather3
  • Symptoms may also be the result of poorly controlled persistent asthma; consider long-term controller therapy3

References

  1. Weiler JM, Anderson SD, Randolph C, et al. Pathogenesis, prevalence, diagnosis, and management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: a practice parameter. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010;105:S1-S47.
  2. Rakkhong K, Kamchaisatian W, Vilaiyuk S, et al. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in rhinitis children without asthma. Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol. 2011;29(3):278-S83.
  3. National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health; October 2007.
  4. Kukafka DS, Lang DM, Porter S, et al. Exercise-induced bronchospasm in high school athletes via a free running test. Chest. 1998;114(6):1613-1622.
  5. Milgrom H, Taussig LM. Keeping children with exercise-induced asthma active. Pediatrics. 1999;104(3):e38.
  6. ProAir HFA Prescribing Information. Horsham, PA: Teva Respiratory, LLC; June 2016.

COPD resources

Learn about the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with our COPD resources.

COPD resources

Guidelines for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are available from the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease.1 Below are a few of the key recommendations.

How is COPD diagnosed?

  • Consider in patients with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of exposure to:
    • -
      Tobacco smoke
    • -
      Occupational dust and chemicals
    • -
      Smoke from home cooking and heating fuels
  • Confirm diagnosis by performing spirometry

COPD treatment1

  • Encourage current smokers to quit
  • Bronchodilator medications, including short-acting beta2-agonists (SABAs) for COPD management
  • Consider influenza and pneumonia vaccination
  • Consider exercise training programs to help improve exercise tolerance and reduce dyspnea and fatigue

Reference

  1. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health/World Health Organization; 2014.

Patient assistance

Your patients may qualify for financial help through the
Teva Cares Foundation Patient Assistance Program.

Learn more and download the
Teva Cares Foundation application

Patient assistance

Teva Cares Foundation Patient Assistance Program

Teva Respiratory is committed to providing patients with high-quality medicines for asthma, COPD, and EIB. Your patient may qualify for assistance from the Teva Cares Foundation if you meet the conditions below.

To qualify for assistance from this program, patients must:

  1. Be a resident of the United States, Puerto Rico, or the US Virgin Islands.
  2. Not be eligible for any prescription drug benefits through any private or public insurer/payer/program.
  3. Have a total family annual income of 300% or below the federal poverty level for their state.
  4. Have a prescription for one or more of the Teva medicines listed on the application.

To enroll your patient, download a copy of the
Teva Cares Foundation application

  • Patients will be notified by mail of program acceptance or denial
  • If the patient is approved, you will receive a form to complete and return
  • Medicine(s) will be shipped to your office directly from the Teva pharmacy
  • Once approved, patients are eligible to receive assistance for up to 12 months
  • Renewals will be handled on a per-patient basis

Questions? Please call the Teva Cares Foundation toll free at 1-877-237-4881.

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